Archives

Uncategorized

How to Hire A Painter

I never understand why people say “it’s just paint”, or “painting is easy”, that “you can just change it” or that “paint is cheap”, etc etc. People who say that must not have gone through the process of choosing colors, hiring painters, having your home covered in tarps and smelling like weird plastic for a week. True, painting is cheaper than moving, but it’s not inexpensive either. A good paint job takes time to accomplish and should last at least ten years, and if you are going to go through the above mentioned process, you want to be happy with the final result. The best way to achieve this? Educate yourself a bit on the painting process, determine what results you want to see, and learn how to communicate your needs effectively so that you and your painter are on the same page from day one.

How do you find a painter for starters? Ask for recommendations from people that you know and trust. Ask them what was the best thing and worse thing about the experience, and what they would have done differently had they the chance. Once you’ve narrowed down potential painters then set up individual walk throughs. The walk through is going to be the most important part of the process. Take time to do a thorough walk through. Trust me. This is where the communication comes into play and sets the tone for the whole process going forward.

Start with your walls. Are your walls drywall or plaster? If plaster, how much repair do they need? Do you want the painter to simply fill in cracks, or do you want him/her to smooth your walls so much that they look brand new? A level five drywall finish is when your walls look perfect. Do you need your plaster walls to look like drywall? Or do you want your plaster to retain some character? Decide what you’ll be happy with, and the quote you receive from the painter will reflect this.

Next, move on to millwork. Millwork refers to baseboards, crown, door casings, window trim, bead board, chair rail, any detail on your walls. Painting millwork is time consuming and therefore can add a lot to a painter’s quote. Sometimes it’s necessary to paint to get a finished look. Decide with your painter what millwork, if any, that you want painted.

You also need to discuss doors. A painter may paint your crown and baseboards but do not assume he/she is including doors. If they are in good shape, you may not need them painted. But if your millwork is getting painted, will your doors match? Will your painters paint both sides? And what about your closets? You need to specify if you want the inside of your closets painted. Most painters will not assume to paint the inside of closets unless asked.

Now on to ceilings. Ceilings that are in good shape and do not have signs of cracks or water damage don’t necessarily have to be painted. But if there is damage to them, will the painter fix it? If you have stucco or popcorn ceilings, will the painter paint them so that they look seamless with the rest of the ceiling?

Do you have kitchen or bathroom cabinets that you want to see painted? Cabinets, like millwork, require a different types of paint from wall paint. Make sure you understand the product that your painter is going to use on your cabinets, as well as the process to prepping and painting cabinets.

Now on to paint. There are many different types of paint out there and you need to educate yourself a bit on the types of paint because there can be big differences in cost. The most basic level of paint offers the minimum of coverage (called hide) and is generally used for commercial purposes, like landlords needing to repaint after a tenant leaves. Paint companies offer products up from here and they can range in coverage and VOCs (volatile organic compound) and specialty, such as moisture resistant paint, primer and paint in one, etc. You must specify with your painter which type paint you want to use because painters will usually buy the paint for you and include it in the overall cost. I don’t want to be alarmist here but I’ve heard of painters charging a client for a higher level product and then purchasing a cheaper paint and pocketing the difference. And the difference in cost can be significant. Imagine paying up front for ten gallons of paint at $50 a can but your painter then uses your deposit to buy $25 gallon paint and hopes you don’t notice the difference. To avoid this scenario, tell them you want to see the cans, and tell them that you want the cans left at your home when the job is done. Don’t assume they will – I have heard stories of painters taking cans purchased by one homeowner and using them on another job, all the while charging the second homeowner for the same can of paint!

Once your colors and the type of paint you want to use are chosen then you need to specify what sheen you want on your walls and millwork. Flat? Matte? Eggshell? Pearl?Satin? If you are not sure, pick up a sheen chart at your local paint store. You know how your home is used, not the painter. If you have lots of kids in high traffic areas, put a sheen on the wall that can be easily wiped off. If you hate the wet look on trim, make sure to tell your painter you want a more matte finish.

Compare quotes. You should get at least three detailed quotes from the painters and compare them, apples to apples, on what is to be painted and which product and whether paint and materials (drop cloths, brushes, etc) are included.

When will they work? 9-5? Do you want them in your home on the weekends? At night? Early in the morning? Specify when you want them in your home. Ask them how long the project will take. Will they call you if they can’t come that day?

Specify low VOC or no VOC paints if you want them. Most paints are low VOC these days, but not all, so make sure you are on the same page. Primers have VOCs in them, so make sure you know how much odor the primer will give off.

Educating yourself on the painting process will insure that you are 100% happy with the finished product. And believe me. Once the job is done, you’ll be happy you won’t have to repeat it for a long time.

How to Achieve Asymmetrical Balance

We all know how balance things, right? I’m not talking about balance in your day to day life. That to me is as elusive and imaginary as a pink unicorn. But most of us do know the meaning of balance when it comes to your decor. You put two matching end tables with two matching lamps on top and set those on either side of the sofa. Boom. But did you know that it’s easy to create balance even without those matched sets? It’s just about knowing the laws of balance.

Take the first example below. You can see how everything is perfectly balanced because one side is an exact mirror of the other. Lovely? Yes. A bit boring? Mmm.

asymmetrical-balance-2

Balance has more to do with the visual weight of things rather than the exact replica of things. The first picture has the same visual weight on either side and therefore our eye registers it as balanced.

Let’s go to the second example:

asymmetrical-balance-2

Your eye also sees this as balanced, even though the opposite sides are definitely not mirrors of each other. So what’s going on here? The tree on the right is tall. Our eye needs something equally commanding – equal visual weight –  on the opposite side to balance the look. Placing several bushes on the other side in varying sizes, shapes and colors gives visual balance to the tall tree. And notice how the wide bushes are slightly closer to the center – the front door – than the tree? Our eye needs larger things  – the bunch of bushes – to be closer to the center and smaller things further away from the center in order to register balance. Just think of a see saw – if one person is heavier than the other, how do you achieve balance? By moving the heavier person closer to the center of the board. You achieve the same thing visually in design.

The bottom image is not balanced. It’s easy to see but can you explain why? All of the heaviness is off to one side. The trees plus the bushes and shrubs takes up a lot of space visually AND they are closer to the center of the line.  In this example if the bush and tree on the left were moved closer to the front door and everything on the right were moved further to the right there would be more balance. It still wouldn’t be perfect but it would better than it is now.

asymmetrical-balance-2

So how does knowing how to create asymmetrical balance help you in your space? Take this symmetrically balanced fireplace mantle for example:

source: muse interiors

Very elegant. But a bit staid, right? What if you had a lot of things you wanted to display, or even swap out from time to time? Take a look at this example of asymmetrical design perfectly executed:

asymmetrical-balance-3

source: morgan harrison home

The larger frames are closest to the center line. Plus there are more little frames on one side, to balance out the largest frame on the other. You can achieve this with anything if you just remember to balance out your heavies with your lights and keep the heavies closer to the center line.

Play around with objects on a shelf in your home to achieve asymmetrical balance. I’m off to tackle my checkbook. That is one balance that will not be achieved so easily.

Holiday Decorating

I recently helped a client get her dining room ready for Christmas. When she called me we had just under four weeks to make the room feel more inviting and warm before 18 relatives descended upon her. She was a quick decision maker and excellent notetaker,  so while I gave direction, she quickly executed. We started with a new wall color  – a warm gray. There was a nice sized hole in one of the plaster walls and no way to get a painter in by Christmas. My client patched and painted by herself like a pro. Next we pulled new drapes in a bold pattern and a wool rug with soft lines to give the room more texture. A print on one wall was replaced with a striking mirror that added a lot of interest and helped bounce light around the room. Vases, lots of red and silver accents, holiday plants, and lights strung from the drapery rods added holiday charm and warmth. Good job CM!